TagWindows

Switch from a Local Account to Microsoft Account in Windows 8.1

Windows-8-Metro-logoWhen I recently built my new PC, I upgraded to an Asus Maximus VII Hero motherboard with the Z97 chipset and Intel® I218V, 1 x Gigabit LAN Controller. I installed Windows 8.1 via a flash drive, and I immediately could tell that Win 8.1 did not include a driver for my Intel LAN controller. It was obvious because during installation Win 8.1 asked to create a local account and did not ask for my Microsoft account. I provided a basic user name just to get the installation complete and install my network driver. I had the driver included on the flash drive, but I have not yet gone through the process of slipstreaming updates or drivers yet.

With the new driver installed and internet connectivity, I wanted to switch to my Microsoft account so I could get to my synced settings, apps, backgrounds, etc. Here are the steps to keep your current home folder while also switching from a local to a Microsoft account:

  • Go to Charms Bar -> Settings -> Change PC Settings –> Accounts
  • Choose your account, then click Switch to a Microsoft Account
  • Provide your Microsoft account email address and click Next
  • Provide the password and click Finish.
  • Depending on if you have two-factor authentication set up or not, you may have to confirm using the account by text or email with a code. Microsoft just sends me a text message that includes a PIN which I must then supply to Win 8.1.

After a few minutes, all of my synced items are available me on my new PC.

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Remove ^M from Files Using the vi Editor

After moving text files from Microsoft Windows to the UNIX environment, I frequently end up with the ^M characters at the end of each line in the files. This occurs because UNIX uses 0xA for the newline character, while Windows uses a combination of two characters: 0xD 0xA. 0xD is the carriage return character. The vi editor displays 0xD as ^M. The ^M characters do not hurt anything being there, and the files still execute fine despite having the extra characters, but I like my code clean, so I remove the characters whenever I notice them.

To globally remove all of the ^M characters in a file using the vi editor, issue the following vi command:

:%s/^M//g

To enter ^M, type Ctrl-v, then Ctrl-m. (hold down the Ctrl key then press v and m).

  • In UNIX, you can escape a control character by preceding it with a Ctrl-v.
  • The :%s is a basic search and replace command in vi. It tells vi to replace the regular expression between the first and second slashes (^M) with the text between the second and third slashes (nothing in this case).
  • The g at the end directs vi to search and replace globally (all occurrences).
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Remove Entries in the Windows Remote Desktop Connection Client

Remote Desktop ConnectionDo you have an entry for a computer in the Windows Remote Desktop Connection client that you don’t connect to anymore?  A tweak in the registry will remove it.

  1. Open the Run Dialog Box using the Windows Key+R key combination then type regedit in the Open: text box and click OK to start the registry editor.
  2. Drill down the registry tree to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Terminal Server Client\Default, and entries appear as MRUnumber in the right pane.
  3. To delete an entry, right-click it, and then click Delete.
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Turn Off Aero Snap in Windows 7

For those of us who don’t want our windows to automatically become maximized just because we dragged them to another monitor:

  1. Click the Start button to open the Start menu.
  2. Type mouse in the Search Files And Programs box.
  3. Select Change How Your Mouse Works from the list of items that are found.
  4. Select the checkbox for the option Prevent Windows From Being Automatically Arranged When Moved To The Edge Of The Screen.
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The Best Conversion Utility: Convert

Convert - v.4.1 - 779.54 KB

Here is a utility that I have used for a long time.  Convert does exactly what the name suggests: converts just abbout any unit of measure in an easy, straightforward way.  The program is small and fast.  Highly recommended.

from joshmadison.com:

Convert is a free and easy to use unit conversion program that will convert the most popular units of distance, temperature, volume, time, speed, mass, power, density, pressure, energy and many others, including the ability to create custom conversions!

convertani

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Windows Vista Displayed an Unknown Device on Toshiba Tecra

Toshiba

After a clean install of Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 (and subsequent Windows updates) on my Toshiba Tecra M4 tablet, I checked the device manager to see if Vista missed anything.  Only one yellow exclamation point was displayed.  I dug into the properties of the unknown device and it displayed the following information: unknown device – other device on Intel 82801 FBM LPC Interface Controller – 2641.  Doing a search on this information pointed to about half of the notebook devices made during the last few years – nothing useful.  I looked at the hardware ID of the unknown device and it displayed ACPI\IFX0101.  A search on that string produced results including an Infineon TPM (Trusted Platform Module), which I knew existed on my Tecra.  I browsed over to Toshiba.com, downloaded the Trusted Platform Software, and no more unknown devices in the device manager.

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Switch v1.25

Switch enhances the taskbar with an icon which can be used to access all running applications, switch between them and close applications.

Using this application you can switch between running applications and/or close them. Switch is a task-switcher without unnecessary overhead. So it’s simple, fast and just does its job. The Pocket PC edition also supports Landscape mode now.

Switch does not occupy the entire taskbar like other applications of this genre do. So you can continue using other applications (e.g. TaskbarDate) which do something on the taskbar. Since version 1.25 Switch is also optimized for WM2005 devices. At the moment Switch can be used on the following platforms: Palm-sized PC, PPC2002, WM2003 and WM2005. Switch may also work on PPC2000.

Features:

  • Integrates into the standard Windows CE taskbar.
  • Show desk (displays today screen; the name can be changed using tweaks).
  • Close current (closes the application which is currently on top).
  • Close all (closes all running applications).
  • Close all but current (closes all running application but not the application which is currently on top).
  • Plug-Ins.
  • Ignore (ignore configured application names).

Get more info here…

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ClearTemp for Windows Mobile

ClearTemp is an application for you to free up storage space on your device. It allows you to clear temporary/unused files and unused registry keys/values on your system easily. It also allows you to clear your Recent Program List, Internet Address History and soft reset counter. You can even change the location of the temporary folders (Cache, History & Cookies) or e-mail attachment folder to the Storage Card. If you have custom folders/files which you wish to clear, you can also add them in.

More info here…

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Turning Your Garmin GPSMap 60CSx into a Flash Drive

If you are like me, you carry your handheld GPS with you wherever you go.  I can never seem to keep up with my USB flash drives though.  They are never with me when I need them.  That doesn’t matter because you can turn your micro-SD card-equipped Garmin handheld into a portable flash drive.  You’ll need your GPS and transfer cable.  Here are the simple steps:

  1. Connect your USB cable to the computer and Garmin and turn the Garmin on.  The computer would need the Garmin USB driver loaded.
  2. Go to the main menu of the Garmin (I typically push the menu button twice no matter what page I am on) and scroll to the setup icon and press the enter key.
    60
  3. Scroll to the interface icon and press the enter key.
    60_2
  4. Scroll down to the USB Mass Storage button and press the enter key.
    60_3
  5. Your Garmin is now in Mass Storage mode (can’t use the GPS capability or get a screen shot).
  6. Open Windows Explorer and browse to your newly-mounted drive.  The drive name will typically be what you named your SD card (or how it came from the manufacturer).  Files can now be copied to and from the GPS.
  7. After files are transferred, use the Windows Eject or Safely Remove Hardware techniques disconnect the GPS from the PC.
  8. Press the Garmin power button to exit Mass Storage mode.
  9. According to Garmin, this technique works similarly on Macintosh computers.

When I want to work with my .gpx files in software such as GPSTrackMaker, I just put my 60CSx into Mass Storage mode and open the files straight off the Garmin – convenient!

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